James Caserta: The Simplicity of Walking by Faith

1 Jan

https://jamescaserta.wordpress.com/2020/12/30/the-simplicity-of-walking-by-faith/?fbclid=IwAR0yQfM-LBCAFtpEcmwJ89X5e5o1BUPhDtRxIrkH71bKAkuuKP1V7P25yIk

Levin: On Jan. 6, we learn whether our Constitution will hold – TheBlaze

30 Dec

And whether congressional Republicans care
— Read on www.theblaze.com/op-ed/levin-on-january-6-we-learn-whether-our-constitution-will-hold

Mark Caserta: Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” offers timely perspective for us all!

17 Dec

Just a few days away from the most magical day of the year, I find myself reflecting on the lyrics from the first stanza of John Lennon’s 1971 Christmas song, “So this is Christmas.”

“So, this is Christmas. And what have you done? Another year over. And a new one just begun.”

This question is particularly thought-provoking for those who’ve been engaged this year in the state of our country, our city and our fellow man. Regardless of your political or religious persuasion, I think most would agree we’ve seen an unparalleled level of quarreling and animosity among people this year.

A few years back I wrote a Christmas column entitled, “Perhaps we should reflect on the chains we’ve forged.” I keep a copy with our Christmas decorations. Each year, when my wife has me carry the decorations upstairs for her to magically transform our home for the holidays, I’m greeted by the newspaper clipping resting in “mechanical” Santa’s lap!

Here’s a modified excerpt from my 2013 column.

The brilliance and imagery of the Charles Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol,” offers a timeless reflection of the magical consequences of human kindness.

Of his tale, Dickens wrote, “I have endeavored in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it.”

And “haunt” us it has for over 170 years with its sustained relevance for mankind and its sobering look at the sanctity and opportunity of life.

Ebenezer Scrooge was a man, lost within his own maize of anxiety, stripped of his compassion for others whose significance diminished as his wealth grew.

Yet, while unworthy of his journey of recompense, Scrooge was given an opportunity to witness the chains he forged in life from the third person as he was led on a journey by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come.

I can only surmise Dickens chose Christmas as the setting of his tale of repentance because of the depth of purpose he envisioned it had for his fellow man and the opportunity it offered for reflecting upon one’s life choices.

I believe, however, Dickens is prompting us to invoke similar introspection.

How would your journey fare with the three apparitions? What chains have you forged?

Life’s choices in today’s world are exceedingly complex and follow a path dimly lit and laden with distractions unique to our times.

Ebenezer Scrooge had some ghostly mentors to influence change in his life and Dickens ensured his tale allowed Scrooge to alter his future.

Unfortunately, none of us have Dickens’ script guaranteeing our life tomorrow. And all too often we find ourselves wishing we’d made better choices or extended unselfish, random gifts of kindness to others.

I suggest using Christmas, as Dickens did, to reflect upon the chains we may have forged in life and begin working toward reducing the links.

Before we find it’s too late to impact our legacy and future.

Merry Christmas everyone!

Doug Smith: To govern or to rule?

14 Dec
Doug Smith is an opinion columnist, historian and associate editor for Free State Patriot

December 14, 2020

This is a distinction which many do not recognize, but is one of great importance. Most people, except for anarchists, accept that societies must be governed lest they fall into chaos. Many accept that premise, and consent to be governed (a supremely important condition: consent of the governed) in return for the stability of those around them being governed as well, and by the same laws.

Men will accept that they cannot break in and take their neighbors’ property because they desire it, with the implicit corollary that their neighbors, or the passing stranger, will be subject to the same restraint. The implied social contract is that we accept governance, and grant part of our authority to certain people to govern, enact, and enforce laws, under which we all agree to live. The express and written contract, the US Constitution, establishes clearly rules for conducting and governing ourselves, subject to those whom we will elect to exercise the authority under which we agree to live. In case you slept through or never attended 7th grade Civics, that is the Representative Republic under which we have lived since 1789.

We the people, constituted this republic in a written document of our laws and structure, and agreed that these were the laws under which our citizens would live. So then, our officials govern with the consent of the governed, as expressed in that constitution, establishing our form of government, the methods for selecting who would govern, and, vitally, establishing the limits to which we would accept said governance.

We accept a Congress which may levy taxes and declare war. We do not accept Prima Nocte.

Citizens who wish to stand for election to public office do so in order to govern, as accepted by that contract under which we, as citizens, agree to live, and by our choice. Elected officials are expected to, and should expect to, govern.

Then there are those who wish to rule. One who rules over others does so on a simple basis: because I said so. A ruler backs up such pronouncements with the threat of force. William the Conqueror ruled England because he raised and kept an army and used it to force his rule on the Saxons on England. “By right of conquest” is an ancient justification for ruling a people. The Saxons may not appreciate being ruled by the Normans, or the Chinese by the Mongols, or the Lithuanians by the Russians. Such people are often called subjects, because they are subject to the power, and whim, of their rulers. A ruler may also govern well, as in the case of Bernadotte in Sweden. The problem is that the supply of benevolent dictators is rather sparse. More often they govern poorly, placing their own needs and hungers above that of the people they rule. Hence common soldiers bleed to expand the demesnes of a Duke or Prince, and the rewards of their exertions are not their own. What they are given for their blood is out of noblesse oblige, their Lord granting what he chooses, in return for their forced service.

Henry’s “band of brothers” speech notwithstanding, it is usually not a very good bargain to be a subject. Just by the implication of the word, you are subject to power and a person who is greater than yourself. You worth is only what your ruler chooses to attach to you.

A citizen of a republic, on the other hand, is entitled to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and may develop worth based on his abilities and willingness to work and sacrifice. If he chooses to fight and defend his land, it is because of the value he places on it, and his place in it. It is not so his Prince can call himself the Duke of Aquitaine.

The United States was formed as a Republic of citizens who were subjects and determined that they would be free citizens, and subjects no more, regardless the cost. Citizens, as we know, are not always governed well. But they can “Throw the bums out” every few years, and not take down the King when things get really bad. It is a much better thing to be governed than to be ruled.  Rulers do so by their own whim, and are not obligated to abide by their orders to their subjects. Representatives of citizens who enact or enforce laws are subject to the same laws and the guy waiting tables or stacking shelves.

We eat at the same table, sit in the same boat, and walk on the same road. There is no royal road to geometry. In a Republic, there is no Royal road to anywhere. Governors and Senators, Presidents and Vice Presidents, are subject to the same laws and the rest of us. There is, or should be, no Royal road for the children of elected officials to establish them into a dynasty.

That was the heritage and legacy the founders left for this new nation, and new experiment in self-governance. We, the people, would elect our leaders. They in turn, would govern, not rule, in accordance with laws under which we agreed to be governed. They left us “a Republic, if we could keep it.

So, with that brief history synopsis, look around. Do we have leaders faithful to that vision and the laws to which we have consented? Do we have officials who wish to rule by fiat: Because I said so, you must do what I say but must not do? You may not do what I may do.

Do they wish to govern, or to rule? We live in a Republic which rejected the Divine Right of Kings, loudly. If we have petit kings who wish to rule free citizens, it’s time to throw the Bums out.

Reject Rulers. Elect leaders. Establish justice. Hold on to the blessings of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness for ourselves and our posterity.

Fox News: Trump Team moves forward with election challenges.

6 Dec

parler.com/post/1b6c2428fc524f1cb9b618460bbff91c

Dr. Jerome Corsi: How the 2020 Election ends in a Trump victory

6 Dec

Topic / Twitter
— Read on mobile.twitter.com/i/topics/news/e-869011392

Trump campaign has to ‘move quickly’ to reach the Supreme Court on election issues: Dershowitz | Fox Business Video

3 Dec

Harvard Law Professor Emeritus Alan Dershowitz argues the Trump campaign has to show evidence to the Supreme Court before December 14th.
— Read on video.foxbusiness.com/v/6213879044001/

Washington Examiner: Democrats face accusations of fraud in house race after 28K vote election night lead erased by judge and mail-in ballots

30 Nov

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/democrats-face-accusations-of-fraud-in-house-race-after-28k-vote-election-night-lead-erased-by-judge-and-mail-in-ballots

Williamsport Sun-Gazette: Trump attorneys to take case to Supreme Court

27 Nov
MARK NANCE/Sun-Gazette Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, left, waves to the crowd as he arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse and Herman T. Schneebeli Federal Office Building Tuesday for a hearing before U.S. District Court Judge Matthew T. Brann Tuesday.

https://www.sungazette.com/news/top-news/2020/11/trump-attorneys-to-take-case-to-supreme-court/

Lawyers for President Donald J. Trump said Sunday that a federal court judge’s dismissal of their case Saturday on trying to stop the results of the election from being certified by state Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar gives them opportunity to bring their case to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Rudy Giuliani, attorney to President Trump and Jenna Ellis, senior legal adviser to Trump 2020 Campaign, said a decision by U.S. Middle District Judge Matthew W. Brann to dismiss the case will help them move the case to the higher court.

Brann dismissed the lawsuit against Boockvar and seven counties, brought by Trump’s campaign for reelection, dealing another blow to the president’s attempts to undermine Election 2020’s decisive results.

“Today’s decision turns out to help us in our strategy to get expeditiously to the U.S. Supreme Court,” Trump lawyers said.

“Although we fully disagree with this opinion, we’re thankful to the President Barack Obama-appointed judge for making this anticipated decision quickly, rather than simply trying to run out the clock.”

Trump is seeking an expedited appeal to the Third Circuit.

“There is so much evidence that in Pennsylvania, Democrats eliminated our opportunity to present 50 witnesses and other evidence that election officials blatantly ignored Pennsylvania’s law denying independent review,” the Trump team said.

“This resulted in 682,777 ballots being cast illegally, wittingly or unwittingly.”

“We are disappointed we did not at least get the opportunity to present our evidence at a hearing,” Giuliani and Ellis said.

“We hope that the Third Circuit will be as gracious as Judge Brann in deciding our appeal one way or the other as expeditiously as possible.”

“This is another case that appears to be moving quickly to the United States Supreme Court.”

However, civil rights and advocacy groups led by the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, the ACLU Voting Rights Project, Public Interest Law Center, and the law firm Covington & Burling LLP represented the Black Political Empowerment Project, Common Cause Pennsylvania, League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania, NAACP Pennsylvania State Conference, and eight impacted voters as intervenors. Last week, hailed Brann hailed the ruling as a victory for democracy and the state’s voters.

“The court saw through the attempts by President Trump and his enablers in Washington and Harrisburg to interfere with democracy,” said Reggie Shuford, executive director of the ACLU of Pennsylvania. “The people of Pennsylvania have had their say, and it time to put this election behind us.”

MARK MARONEY

mmaroney@sungazette.com

Doug Ross @ Journal: INFOGRAPHIC: The Shocking Allegations of Mass Vote Fraud Made by Sidney Powell in Georgia

26 Nov

INFOGRAPHIC: The Shocking Allegations of Mass Vote Fraud Made by Sidney Powell in Georgia
— Read on directorblue.blogspot.com/2020/11/infographic-shocking-allegations-of.html

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