Trump’s approval rating jumps to 51 percent

16 Apr

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Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

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Monday, April 16, 2018

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Monday shows that 51% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Forty-eight percent (48%) disapprove.

The latest figures include 35% who Strongly Approve of the way the president is performing and 39% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -4. (see trends).

Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m.  Eastern (sign up for free daily email update).

Now that Gallup has quit the field, Rasmussen Reports is the only nationally recognized public opinion firm that still tracks President Trump’s job approval ratings on a daily basis. If your organization is interested in a weekly or longer sponsorship of Rasmussen Reports’ Daily Presidential Tracking Poll,  please send e-mail to beth@rasmussenreports.com .

Former FBI Director James Comey has taken to print and the airwaves to angrily denounce Trump, the man who fired him last year. But voters don’t rate Comey’s FBI performance too highly, and more think he should be legally punished for leaking to the media. 

Comey incorrectly notes in his new book that polls in October 2016 showed Hillary Clinton was most likely to win the presidency. Not all polls. Rasmussen Reports and two others showed that it was a close race, and they were the ones who proved to be right on Election Day.

Comey earned the wrath of many Democrats just before Election Day 2016 with his reopening and reclosing of the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s mishandling of classified information. Clinton initially listed Comey’s actions as perhaps the chief reason for her stunning loss to Trump, and 44% of Democrats agreed.

At the time, however, 60% of all voters agreed with Comey’s decision to go public with the reopened investigation shortly before the election. In a survey just before that decision was announced, 53% continued to disagree with the FBI’s decision not to seek a criminal indictment of Clinton.

Prior to reports of a new gas attack on civilians in Syria, fewer voters here viewed the war-torn Middle Eastern nation as vital to U.S. national security.

Tomorrow’s Tax Day. Find out at 10:30 how many Americans expect to make the deadline.

Some states are attempting to tackle income inequality at the state level, but when it comes to salaries, Americans think decisions should stay in the hands of the employer.

Still, most Americans support equal pay for men and women, although they’re not convinced that discrimination is the sole reason for wage disparities now.

See “What They Told Us” in surveys last week.

Some readers wonder how we come up with our job approval ratings for the president since they often don’t show as dramatic a change as some other pollsters do. It depends on how you ask the question and whom you ask.

To get a sense of longer-term job approval trends for the president, Rasmussen Reports compiles our tracking data on a full month-by-month basis.

Rasmussen Reports has been a pioneer in the use of automated telephone polling techniques, but many other firms still utilize their own operator-assisted technology (see methodology).

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 2.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Results are also compiled on a full-week basis and crosstabs for full-week results are available for Platinum Members.

 

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