Mark Caserta: Security essential to protecting students

26 May

me

Mark Caserta:  Free State Patriot editor

May 25, 2018

 

shootings

 

Just 20 weeks into 2018, we’ve already had 22 school shootings in the United States where someone was hurt or killed, per a recent CNN column by Saeed Ahmed and Christina Walker. Averaging over 1 per week is simply incomprehensible.

The column had a U.S. map inserted identifying the locations of the shootings by bullet points. The graphic eerily reminded me of a “firing range shot grouping” surrounding the Tri-State area.  The column and graphic can be viewed at:  https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/school-shootings-2018-list-trnd/index.html.

Gun control advocates are dangerously off-base with their notions of taking weapons out of the hands of law-abiding citizens. When you restrict guns from properly vetted, trained, law abiding citizens, you broaden the window of opportunity for a criminal who will not abide by the law.

Recently, The Heritage Foundation published a commentary, originally appearing in The Daily Signal, by Steven P. Bucci, a visiting fellow who focuses on cybersecurity, military special operations, and defense support to civil authorities, entitled, “4 Steps to Better School Security.”

In the column, Bucci lays out definitive steps we must take to protect our children from the malicious, domestic attacks we see escalating in our nation’s schools.

The first step mandates a “Pre-emptive Response.” Most school shooters have had some sort of mental health or social interaction issue of which someone took notice. In nearly all the school shootings, there were clear warning signs which emerged before the shooting occurred, whether on social media or interactions with others.

The second of the 4 steps involves, “Controlling Access to School Facilities.” If an unauthorized person is attempting to enter the school or if someone is attempting to bring in a weapon, they must be denied access. Bucci recommends schools have limited points of entry (one or two, at most) that are monitored and controlled. Allowing people to enter without authorization is a huge point of vulnerability and will be exploited by the shooter. No provisions should be made for convenience!

Third is “Securing Classrooms.” Classrooms are usually the teacher’s only option for sheltering in place, particularly for younger children. Bucci recommends classroom doors either not have windows or a speedy way to cover them in an active shooter situation. The doors must be lockable from the inside and have a quick “blocking” mechanism as well.

Interestingly, there are now bulletproof sanctuaries that can be put inside classrooms and double as “story corners.” While this may seem to be beyond the budget of some schools, one must weigh the alternative cost. I strongly believe this should be a serious consideration.

Finally, “On-Site Response” is critical. Per Bucci, schools must be equipped with the ability to confront and stop an active shooter on-site. Most active shooter scenarios are done in three to six minutes.

It’s simply become irresponsible for schools not to have trained, armed security in place. And if a teacher is adequately trained with a firearm and how to respond in an active shooter scenario, he or she should be allowed to carry.

Protecting our classrooms is a huge responsibility and one every parent should support. This disturbing trend of dying children must stop. If we can spend millions of dollars providing resources to protect our nation’s leaders, we can certainly spend the equivalent protecting our future leaders.

Mark Caserta is a conservative blogger, a Cabell County resident and a regular contributor to The Herald-Dispatch editorial page.

One Response to “Mark Caserta: Security essential to protecting students”

  1. Brittius May 27, 2018 at 3:23 am #

    Reblogged this on .

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: